Papers

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Shadows of Violence
India’s Near Abroad through the Lens of Land Connectivity

By DR.DEIGRACIANONGKYNRIH, PhD. Department Of Economics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong and DR.SUPARNABHATTACHARJEE, PhD. Department Of Political Science, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong. INTRODUCTION The 21st Century has been marked Continue Reading →Asian Confluence, North East, Shillong,, Meghalaya, River Festival

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Shadows of Violence
In the Shadows Of Violence: Migration, Perceptions of Security and Tales of Horror in Post -Partition Northeast India

By BINAYAK DUTTA, PhD. Department of History, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong.   Introduction   Over the years, politics in northeast India  has been mired by a clamour over human Continue Reading →Asian Confluence, North East, Shillong,, Meghalaya, River Festival

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Shadows of Violence
Tourism : Act Global, Think Regional
By M.P.Bezbaruah, Member of Parliament

“Tourism is the force that will make the global village truly one world” wrote John Naisbitt in 1994 in his book ‘The Global Paradox’. In the two decades from then the world has seen that as a contributor to world economy tourism has no equal. It has been an economic and social phenomenon without parallel. Till the beginning of the new millennium

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Some thoughts on the River Festival
By Rangan Dutta, Distinguished Fellow, Asian Confluence

1. The Ganga- Brahmaputra- Meghna basin and the Mekong- Irrawaddy river systems originated in the Asian Highlands forming the Himalayas and the Tibetan plateau.These rivers and the basins they serve are integral to the eco system of the region and the delta in particular which is not divisible in ecological sense by manmade political boundaries. In fact the delta of Bengal is the only large compact delta land that has ever been divided in human history

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“People to People contact”:Indo-Bangladesh relations
By K.C.Reddy, Distinguished Fellow, Asian Confluence

Indo -Bangladesh relations are of strategic importance to both the countries but their potential is yet to be realized fully. India and Bangladesh are politically, socially and economically integral part of South Asian subcontinent. Historically, some of the North Eastern states not only shared a physical border but also shared cultural, social and economic ties with Bangladesh on account of common language and heritage. Hence, in spite of foreign policy being a union subject, North Eastern states by virtue of their strategic location and bordering Bangladesh play a vital role in shaping of the relations between both countries.

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